Pesquisar

detritus toxicus

Curadoria de conteúdos

Categoria

Filosofia

The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children (Hardback) – Routledge

This rich and diverse collection offers a range of perspectives and practices of Philosophy for Children (P4C). P4C has become a significant educational and philosophical movement with growing impact on schools and educational policy. Its community of inquiry pedagogy has been taken up in community, adult, higher, further and informal educational settings around the world.The internationally sourced chapters offer research findings as well as insights into debates provoked by bringing children’s voices into moral and political arenas and to philosophy and the broader educational issues this raises, for example:historical perspectives on the fielddemocratic participation and epistemic, pedagogical and political relationshipsphilosophy as a subject and philosophy as a practicephilosophical teaching across the curriculumembodied enquiry, emotions and spaceknowledge, truth and philosophical progressresources and texts for philosophical inquiryethos and values of P4C practice and research.The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children will spark new discussions and identify emerging questions and themes in this diverse and controversial field. It is an accessible, engaging and provocative read for all students, researchers, academics and educators who have an interest in Philosophy for Children, its educational philosophy and its pedagogy.

Fonte: The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children (Hardback) – Routledge

Can We Think Critically Anymore? | Big Think

In a May 2015 New Yorker article, satirist Andy Borowitz warned of a “powerful new strain of fact-resistant humans who are threatening the ability of Earth to sustain life.” Although humans are endowed with an ability to “receive and process information,” he writes, these faculties have been rendered “totally inactive.”

Readers enjoy Borowitz because his writing is uncomfortably close to

reality. While most articles are close enough to the ballpark you can hear the game, this particular piece hardly seems satirical. The medium of the Internet, where most people get their information and news on a daily basis, is not designed for nuanced, critical thinking; it incites our brain’s reptilian response system: scan it, believe it, rage against it (or proudly repost it without having read the content).

Cognitive psychologist and neuroscientist Daniel Levitin would agree. In fact, he’s written an entire book on the subject. The author of insightful previous works, This Is Your Brain on Music and The Organized Mind, in A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age he takes to task our seemingly growing inability to weigh multiple ideas in making informed decisions, relying instead on emotional reactivity clouded by invented statistics and murky evidence.

Misinformation has been a fixture of human life for thousands of years, and was documented in biblical times and classical Greece. The unique problem we face today is that misinformation has proliferated; it is devilishly entwined on the Internet with real information, making the two difficult to separate.

Instead of merely pointing out problems, Levitin offers solutions, stepping into a professorial role with three evaluations: numbers, words, and the world. Through these sections he explores the ways that researchers and companies manipulate statistics, teaching us how to properly read studies without the intended bias.

For example, consider this headline: In the U.S., 150,000 girls and young women die of anorexia each year. This headline would quickly garner tens of thousands of shares, with few of those trigger-happy social media experts thinking through such a stat. So Levitin does it for us. Each year roughly 85,000 women between fifteen and twenty-four die; increase the age to forty-four and you still only have 55,000. The above statistic is impossible, regardless of how sharable.

Throughout this section Levitin returned me to Intro to Logic at Rutgers in the early nineties. He discusses how corporations manipulate graphs to suit their needs, such as one used by Apple CEO Tim Cook. Instead of reporting on Apple’s sluggish iPhone sales in 2013, he instead showed a cumulative graph beginning with 2008. The line, which if reflecting for a poor quarter would include a lethargic ascent, instead focuses the eye on the Himalayan climb of the previous two years. You barely notice the leveling off since your eye returns to his figure standing below it.

Another example is C-Span, which advertises that its network is available in 100 million homes. Of course, there might only be ten people watching, but that wouldn’t sit well. Likewise polling results, some of the most widely skewed numbers currently in the media. He writes,

A sample is representative if every person or thing in the group you’re studying has an equally likely chance of being chosen. If not, your sample is biased.

Since most circulated polls are conducted on landlines, and the demographic that still uses these phones is older, no such poll would represent new voters, who probably have no clue what that curly cord at the end of the receiver is for.

Then there’s simple bias, a neurological habit fully display this week regarding presidential health. Forget numbers, we’re a visual species. Hillary Clinton’s slip has been defined as everything from a minor tumble to an avalanche of skin, depending on the viewer’s political inclinations. Levitin explains the bigger picture:

We also have a tendency to apply critical thinking only to things we disagree with.

The Internet might very well have been designed for confirmation bias. If you have a theory, you’ll find some site purporting it to be true. (I’m constantly amazed at how many people post Natural News stories on my feed, as if anything on the site is valid.) Levitin notes that MartinLutherKing.org is run by a white supremacist group. Even experts get fooled: Reporter Jonathan Capehart published a Washington Post article “based on a tweet by a nonexistent congressman in a nonexistent district.”

In The Organized Mind, Levitin writes that the human brain can only process 120 bits of information per second—not exactly Intel. Besides, our brain does not just process data, but is constantly scanning our environment for potential threats. Since we don’t have tigers to run from, and since we generally don’t commune in person (compared to time spent online), our emotional reactivity is directed at apparitions.

Add to this the fact that our attention is pulled in thousands of directions every day from advertisers purposefully falsifying information, eschewing traditional marketing under cover of ‘brand ambassadors’ and invented data. Taking the time to contemplate and comprehend what Nicholas Carr calls ‘deep knowledge’ is a forgotten art. Two thousand years ago people memorized the 100,00 shloka (couplets) of the Mahabharata. Today we forget what we tweeted five minutes ago.

Just as memorization and critical thinking occur when we train our brain like a muscle, it is exceptionally easy to forgo effort when emotionally-charged information is presented right before our eyes. As Levitin writes,

The brain is a giant pattern detector, and it seeks to extract order and structure from what often appear to be random configurations. We see Orion the Hunter in the night sky not because the stars were organized that way but because our brains can project patterns onto randomness.

Sadly, we’re victims of our patterns. Carr wrote The Shallows because, ironically, he could no longer finish reading an entire book. He wanted to know what technology was doing to his brain. Levitin made his own case for this in The Organized Mind. A Field Guide to Lies is an exceptional follow-up, not only describing the mechanisms for how we read and understand, but giving practical and essential advice on what to do about it.

Derek Beres is working on his new book, Whole Motion: Training Your Brain and Body For Optimal Health (Carrel/Skyhorse, Spring 2017). He is based in Los Angeles. Stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

Fonte: Can We Think Critically Anymore? | Big Think

Apps para educação – Rede de Bibliotecas Escolares | Aplicações para dispositivos móveis

Rede de Bibliotecas Escolares | Aplicações para dispositivos móveis

Fonte: Apps para educação – Rede de Bibliotecas Escolares | Aplicações para dispositivos móveis

Star Stuff: assista ao curta-metragem em homenagem a Carl Sagan | Universo Racionalista

Apresentado em 17 de agosto deste ano — porém, com pouca divulgação —, o curta-metragem, produzido por entusiastas do saudoso Carl Sagan, retrata em filme o que Sagan relatou em seus livros: o início de sua admirável paixão pela ciência, quando descobriu que os pontos que via no céu à noite eram sóis como o nosso — só que muito mais distantes —, e que esses sóis distantes poderiam conter centenas de milhares de mundos como o nosso, com vida se perguntando sobre as estrelas, assim como nós.O CurtaO curta é focado na evolução da curiosidade de Carl Sagan quando criança. É retratada a influência que seus pais tiverem sobre ele para que essa paixão surgisse e, também, sobre sua famosa história da biblioteca: quando, acompanhado de sua mãe, pediu à bibliotecária um livro que falasse sobre as estrelas. Desatada, a pobre moça lhe oferece um livro que falava sobre as “estrelas de Hollywood”. Porém, não era sobre aquelas estrelas que Sagan estava interessado. Logo ela pensou, e sem hesitar, sorriu para ele e lhe mostrou um livro cativante que falava sobre os infinitos sóis que existiam no Cosmos. Assim, ajudando um dos maiores popularizadores da ciência de todos os tempos a surgir.Assista ao curta com legenda em português — para ativá-la, clique em “CC”:Star Stuff from Ratimir Rakuljic on Vimeo.É emocionante ver um ícone da ciência ser apresentado de maneira excepcional para o público leigo. Contudo, também ajudando a dar impulso ao filme que a Warner Bros está produzindo, onde será retratada uma história biográfica que contará um pouco de sua carreira e influência para com a popularização da ciência.Para saber mais sobre o curta Star Stuff, clique aqui.

Fonte: Star Stuff: assista ao curta-metragem em homenagem a Carl Sagan | Universo Racionalista

 

Apresentado em 17 de agosto deste ano — porém, com pouca divulgação —, o curta-metragem, produzido por entusiastas do saudoso Carl Sagan, retrata em filme o que Sagan relatou em seus livros: o início de sua admirável paixão pela ciência, quando descobriu que os pontos que via no céu à noite eram sóis como o nosso — só que muito mais distantes —, e que esses sóis distantes poderiam conter centenas de milhares de mundos como o nosso, com vida se perguntando sobre as estrelas, assim como nós.

O Curta

http://www.voxus.tv/player/midcontent/?channel_id=283

O curta é focado na evolução da curiosidade de Carl Sagan quando criança. É retratada a influência que seus pais tiverem sobre ele para que essa paixão surgisse e, também, sobre sua famosa história da biblioteca: quando, acompanhado de sua mãe, pediu à bibliotecária um livro que falasse sobre as estrelas. Desatada, a pobre moça lhe oferece um livro que falava sobre as “estrelas de Hollywood”. Porém, não era sobre aquelas estrelas que Sagan estava interessado. Logo ela pensou, e sem hesitar, sorriu para ele e lhe mostrou um livro cativante que falava sobre os infinitos sóis que existiam no Cosmos. Assim, ajudando um dos maiores popularizadores da ciência de todos os tempos a surgir.

Assista ao curta com legenda em português — para ativá-la, clique em “CC”:

Star Stuff from Ratimir Rakuljic on Vimeo.

É emocionante ver um ícone da ciência ser apresentado de maneira excepcional para o público leigo. Contudo, também ajudando a dar impulso ao filme que a Warner Bros está produzindo, onde será retratada uma história biográfica que contará um pouco de sua carreira e influência para com a popularização da ciência.


Para saber mais sobre o curta Star Stuff, clique aqui.

Filosofia | Le Livros

Categoria: Filosofia Crítica da Razão Prática – Immanuel KantBaixar ou Ler Online Os Ensaios – Michel de MontaigneBaixar ou Ler Online Aristóteles em Nova Perspectiva – Olavo de CarvalhoBaixar ou Ler Online O Jardim das Aflições – Olavo de CarvalhoBaixar ou Ler Online Maquiavel, ou a Confusão Demoníaca – Olavo de CarvalhoBaixar ou Ler Online A Filosofia da Adúltera – Luiz Felipe PondéBaixar ou Ler Online Textos Básicos de Filosofia – Danilo MarcondesBaixar ou Ler Online Filosofia da Caixa Preta – Vilém FlusserBaixar ou Ler Online Sobre a Brevidade da Vida – SênecaBaixar ou Ler Online Didascálicon – Hugo de São VítorBaixar ou Ler Online Ética a Nicômaco – AristótelesBaixar ou Ler Online Justiça – Michael SandelBaixar ou Ler Online O Olho e o Espírito – Merleau-PontyBaixar ou Ler Online A Utilidade do Inútil – Nuccio OrdineBaixar ou Ler Online Os Anjos Bons da Nossa Natureza – Steven PinkerBaixar ou Ler Online Leviatã – Paul AusterBaixar ou Ler OnlinePágina 1 de 9123456789Próxima »

Fonte: Filosofia | Le Livros

 

Categoria: Filosofia

Página 1 de 9123456789

90% das pessoas não sabe pensar – Jornal Tornado

A culpa, de acordo com Robert Swartz, é principalmente da escola que não ensina os alunos de forma activaMuitos já suspeitavam, mas não existiam dados fiáveis…até agora. Robert Swartz, que é médico e investigador no «National Center For Teaching Thinking», revelou o estudo em que se provou que “entre 90 a 95%” da população mundial não sabe pensar adequadamente“.Aconselhamento em dependências químicas e comportamentais, InvestigadoraAdiction CounsellingA culpa, explica, é das escolas, onde se ensina a memorizar e não a raciocinar, usando a criatividade, para resolver problemas.“Poucas pessoas no planeta aprenderam a pensar de forma ampla e criativa.(…). O progresso da Humanidade depende deste tipo de pensamento e tal não existe.” – reforça.Swartz revelou estes dados um mês antes de viajar para Bilbao, onde o ICOT 2015 – Congreso Internacional de Pensamiento se reuniu no que foi a maior conferência sobre a inteligência. Aqui o cientista procurou mostrar que é possível reflectir-se sobre o uso do pensamento nas áreas da educação e do desporto, entre outras.Mais especificamente, este especialista em pedagogia educacional acredita que existem actualmente várias formas de implementar um pensamento que ajude de facto as pessoas a “melhorarem o seu modo de pensar”. Swartz revelou também que a sociedade não sabe como usar a mente porque a escola do século XXI, ainda que sendo completamente diferente dos séculos anteriores, não muda na forma como ensina os mais novos.Como solução para que esta “percentagem dantesca” reduza, Swartz propõe que se fomente a comunicação desde a infância, já que 99% dos problemas do ser humano têm origem na linguística. Por outro lado, considera que as escolas devem criar “sujeitos activos” na hora de aprender, e não passivos, como se está ainda a fazer hoje em dia nas aprendizagens. Com isto quer dizer que sejam capazes de pensar de forma crítica e não limitarem-se a receber informação.Nesta linha de pensamento, Swartz acredita que há que fomentar a empatia nos mais pequenos para que aprendam a valorizar a opinião do outro, o trabalho em equipa e saber estar em conformidade com a maioria, de forma activa, PENSANDO.Swartz criou o TBL (Thinking Based Learning) que transforma as salas de aula tradicionais em salas de aulas centradas-no-aluno. Nestes espaços, os alunos estudam os conteúdos programáticos ao mesmo tempo que desenvolvem as suas especificidades de pensamento, ao contrário do que acontece no modelo tradicional.Em Portugal, a Escola da Ponte não tem salas de aula tradicionais. Inspirada por Paulo Freire e pelo pedagogo francês Célestin FreinetEm alguns países no norte da Europa, como a Noruega ou Dinamarca, algo semelhante começa a ser feito. De facto, as disciplinas tradicionais desapareceram para dar lugar a verdadeiros acontecimentos de aprendizagem. Ou seja: ao estudar-se uma matéria, não só não se estuda de forma isolada como se está permanentemente atento a cada aluno e para o que ele demonstra maior propensão ou maior dificuldade. Desta forma, potenciam-se as mais valias e interesses de forma individual, como garantem um maior apoio nas áreas em que cada aluno mostra mais dificuldade.As matérias, de facto, podem cruzar-se umas com as outras e enquanto se estuda matemática pode estudar-se a métrica de um poema. Só a título de exemplo.Afinal, o mundo está interligado. Fará algum sentido hoje em dia estudar-se disciplinas separadamente, estando os alunos dispostos da maneira que estão numa sala de aula, e a receber passivamente resmas de conteúdos programáticos?E a interacção, faz-se apenas nos intervalos e completamente fora do âmbito da aquisição de conhecimentos?Afinal, o estar na vida não implica tudo isto estar junto, ou seja, aprender activamente, com sentido e vontade?Muito por mudar. Mas os caminhos já estão aí!

 

Nota do editor: referência na legenda da imagem.

Fonte: 90% das pessoas não sabe pensar – Jornal Tornado

Aqui Há Dragões – Uma introdução ao pensamento crítico – YouTube

 

Kant em Atenas – Viriato Soromenho Marques

via Kant em Atenas – Opinião – DN.

Documentário History Channel – “Provando a Existência de Deus”

Provar a existência de Deus é um dos desafios mais interessantes que se colocam a crentes e a não crentes. Mas quando se trata de provar de um ponto de vista científico, o desafio adquire contornos ainda mais interessantes.

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

EM CIMA ↑

%d bloggers like this: